GCI

The Guardian view on school funding: pay fair | Editorial

The worst intergenerational unfairness starts with 18-year-olds leaving school without the right qualifications through no fault of their own A well-aimed, well-founded campaign from the chalk face of the school system can put the chancellor under more pressure than any political assault. Jules White, a headteacher from West Sussex, has been coordinating a letter backed by up to 5,000 fellow heads of primary and secondary schools. They are all from counties that are at the lower end of the per-pupil funding league: they stretch from Cornwall to Cumbria, and on Tuesday they will call on the chancellor, to point out exactly what the Department for Education’s new national funding formula will mean in practice to their budgets. Conservative chancellors are often swift to dismiss such protest as producer interest, but if this is producer interest, it is what producers should be interested in – and what any parent would want their child’s teachers to be campaigning for: the resources available to the children that go to their schools. In the summer, more money was found to smooth the introduction of a scheme that, when it was shown to then prime minister David Cameron, was rejected instantly as an electoral disaster in the making. In fact this is a reform that is long overdue. It needs to work. For that reason alone getting it right should be high in Philip Hammond’s priorities, as he sweats through the final days of budget preparation. The new national funding formula is meant to end the unintended unfairness of some schools getting very much more cash per pupil than other similar schools in a different part of England. It ends local councils’ power to use their own formula to fund schools, and it is meant to stop the postcode lottery. Yet because of the way the system tries to limit the losses any one school can be hit with, the new formula will still see some schools getting up to 60% less than a similar school in a better-funded borough. And many schools are already struggling financially because their budgets have not allowed for rises in costs like pensions and national insurance contributions, or inflation. Nor was there extra cash for a 1% teachers’ pay rise. The Institute for Fiscal Studies has estimated that schools are set to lose nearly £2bn by 2020. 13-11-17
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The Guardian view on school funding: pay fair | Editorial
The worst intergenerational unfairness starts with 18-year-olds leaving school without the right qualifications through no fault of their own A well-aimed, well-founded campaign from the chalk face of the school system can put the chancellor under more pressure than any political assault. Jules White, a headteacher from West Sussex, has been coordinating a letter backed by up to 5,000 fellow heads of primary and secondary schools. They are all from counties that are at the lower end of the per-pupil funding league: they stretch from Cornwall to Cumbria, and on Tuesday they will call on the chancellor, to point out exactly what the Department for Education’s new national funding formula will mean in practice to their budgets. Conservative chancellors are often swift to dismiss such protest as producer interest, but if this is producer interest, it is what producers should be interested in – and what any parent would want their child’s teachers to be campaigning for: the resources available to the children that go to their schools. In the summer, more money was found to smooth the introduction of a scheme that, when it was shown to then prime minister David Cameron, was rejected instantly as an electoral disaster in the making. In fact this is a reform that is long overdue. It needs to work. For that reason alone getting it right should be high in Philip Hammond’s priorities, as he sweats through the final days of budget preparation. The new national funding formula is meant to end the unintended unfairness of some schools getting very much more cash per pupil than other similar schools in a different part of England. It ends local councils’ power to use their own formula to fund schools, and it is meant to stop the postcode lottery. Yet because of the way the system tries to limit the losses any one school can be hit with, the new formula will still see some schools getting up to 60% less than a similar school in a better-funded borough. And many schools are already struggling financially because their budgets have not allowed for rises in costs like pensions and national insurance contributions, or inflation. Nor was there extra cash for a 1% teachers’ pay rise. The Institute for Fiscal Studies has estimated that schools are set to lose nearly £2bn by 2020.
Editorial
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Republicans voted to increase school funding. Do my eyes deceive me? the only time school funding was ever cut-- democrats cut it republicans always increase school funding twice as much as democrats do
Can my mom help me apply for a school without living with her? Schools REQUIRE YOU to attend the school, where you live WITH A PARENT or legal guardian. This is due to tax concerns... to prevent people from just moving anywhere they want and going to school there... kinda like what you are wanting to do. So, the answer is no..if she tried to enroll you in that school, she can be charged with fraud. "But... I would be living with a friend"... the friend is not your legal guardian. Very simple
My friend is moving to the us to live with me? The ONLY way a minor child can move to the US without coming with their legal guardian as a dependent on that guardian's visa is if they are a) accepted into a boarding school and live at the school; or b) they go through a State Department licensed exchange student program and your family is registered as a host family
Can a college make you pay tuition for returned aide after administration drop? Yes indeed they can!! If your costs were covered by financial aid you did not "earn" (according to the Federal regulations concerning Federal Return of Funds), the school is required to return some funding to it's federal source... and now there might just be a balance on the account.... which mean YOU can pay it to the school. Consider: YOU requested admission to this school. YOU somehow ended up withdrawing from school. YOU had access to the institutional advantages that every other student had, and had those same opportunities to obtain an education and continue in school. The school has fixed costs per student, and no way to replace you in the middle of a semester. The school is due tuition and fees according to its published policies, and the Federal government does not appreciate students that waste federal dollars. So, who else should pay for your mistake?
Where can I study to better my low grades? You say there is almost 0 libraries around, so that means there are still libraries? Try and look at a map of your area and see what is near you. There may be a park or another place for you to go. Im sure you could convince your parent/guardian to drive you somewhere if you tell them its to complete school work. Have you ever tried explaining to them about how you view your home environment? If none of that is an option, my best suggestion is to go somewhere in your house where you are comfortable and that is relatively quiet. Try listening to music or skyping/calling with someone so you don't feel as alone.
Is it fair to examine the promises made by Trump during his campaign, and see if, one year later, he has followed through on any of them? It's 100% fair. I'd like him to explain to me, personally, why MY American tax dollars are funding his stupid f'ckin wall when he promised us Mexico would pay for it.
BN
The Guardian view on the Kurdish referendum: a fair question | Editorial The vote by Iraqi Kurds on their desire for independence, due to take place on Monday, poses real risks in an unstable region. But their case deserves to be heard If not now, when? This is the obvious and reasonable question of Iraqi Kurds seeking to exercise the right to self-determination – enshrined by the UN charter, though often ignored – in a referendum on Monday . They already enjoy a high degree of autonomy. They believe their key role in the fight against Islamic State demands recognition, giving them leverage over western powers;
The Guardian view on translation: an interpretative and creative act | Editorial Translation is always an interpretation: an act of creation that also, paradoxically, demands a fierce loyalty to the original text. Translators are our guides into other times and territories. The sonnet was a southern European form brought to England through Thomas Wyatt’s translations of Petrarch.
The Guardian view on Mugabe’s resignation: the end of an era in Zimbabwe | Editorial Zimbabweans cheered and sang as they learned that their president’s 37-year rule was over. But they understand the dangers ahead Robert Mugabe’s liberation hero to his people. When he lost their support he hung on by every means at his disposal. Now his brutal reign is over. But the hope is shaded this time by deep concern about what lies ahead. Forcing his resignation was hardly simple: it took much manoeuvring, a military intervention and the opening of impeachment proceedings before he had to bow to the inevitable. What comes next is mur
The Guardian view on the Brexit talks: no veto for the DUP | Editorial Britain, Ireland and the EU had agreed a form of words. The Democratic Unionist party may be playing to its gallery but it cannot be permitted to override the wishes of the people of these islands The former Irish taoiseach in Brussels on Monday was consistent with such cynicism, it also became clear that something must give on the British side if the multiple disaster of no-deal, still craved by the Tory party’s anti-European and deregulatory zealots, is to be avoided.
The Guardian view on Theresa May: struggling to survive | Editorial The prime minister’s authority is broken. Yet the Tory party has little confidence that anyone else would do the job better Tory party politics, says a leftwing character in James Graham’s new West End play, Labour of Love , consist largely of “posh squirrels fighting in a bag”. This week, the Conservatives look all set to provide spectacular proof of Graham’s character’s scathing comment. Theresa May has come to the party’s conference in Manchester with her authority broken. In June she squandered her majority in an election she
The Guardian view on ‘the mutineers’: protecting parliament | Editorial They are presented as a threat to democracy. But all MPs who challenge the government play a part in strengthening it The “mutineers”, the 15 Conservative MPs pictured on the front of Wednesday’s Daily Telegraph, looked more like new members of a golf club than a clique determined to undermine the will of the people. But this was not meant as a joke, and it had consequences that were not in the least amusing. The 15, all of them potential rebels against the government’s decision to write the EU exit date on to the face of the withdrawal
The Guardian view on the ANC’s new leader: a fresh start | Editorial With the election of Cyril Ramaphosa South Africa has a chance to recover its moral authority, which the rainbow nation gained in its birth but has been lost in the tawdry dealings of the present South Africa’s African National Congress has done the world a favour in state has been conspicuously failing . Contracts were awarded to cronies; 783 counts of corruption if she had won . Her victory would have paved the way for South Africa to become a hereditary kleptocracy. By contrast Mr Ramaphosa is the best chance for recovering the optimi
The Guardian view on opera: still powerful, still relevant | Editorial The V&A’s new exhibition, the first to be shown in its elegant, recently completed extension by architect Amanda Levete, is devoted to the gloriously extreme world of opera. The show, a collaboration with the Royal Opera House, tells a story that begins with the birth pangs of the artform amid the new sounds of Monteverdi’s Coronation of Poppaea in Venice in 1643, continues with the Handel-obsessed London of the early decades of the 18th century, and passes on to the shock of the premiere of The Marriage of Figaro in 1786, with its dangerou
The Guardian view on the SNP conference: deals and ideals | Editorial It is a mistake to write off the Scottish National party on the basis of the 2017 election. But Nicola Sturgeon faces tough practical challenges on Brexit and the public finances The 2017 general election was
The Guardian view on the UK’s next census: counting what counts | Editorial The Office for National Statistics is trying to find an accurate way of measuring the number of trans Britons. It’s harder than it looks Britons have been describing themselves more or less honestly to government at 10-year intervals since 1801, producing each decade a mirror that reflects back the changing world: more populous, healthier, more diverse and (nowadays) getting older. Each time, a few people declare themselves conscientious objectors, and some
The Guardian view on the Reformation: justification through faith | Editorial Luther’s 95 Theses were supposedly nailed to a church door in Wittenberg 500 years ago on Tuesday. It is impossible to read Luther, for all his coarse vitality, as an apostle of common sense. The reformation was an argument within western Christianity, not a rejection of all that had gone before.
The Guardian view on Britain and the customs union: just do it | Editorial A form of words may still get the UK government over next week’s negotiating hurdle in Brussels. But the real answer is a change of policy In 2016, more than 17 million British people voted to leave the European Union. But – as the journalist to the 2016 Conservative conference . Later, they were included in the Mr Timothy lost his job .
The Guardian view on Brexit divorce: Tories divided | Editorial The puzzle of Northern Ireland has seen Theresa May commit to a soft Brexit. But politically she advocates a hard Brexit, outside the single market and customs union. This tension cannot be sustained Divorce is often a stressful, hostile process, riven by bad feeling on both sides. For Theresa May’s government, leaving a union with Europe is proving to be a humiliating experience. It has been embarrassing to witness ministers pursue a strategy of climbdowns to deliver the misguided exit from the European Union. On Friday morning the terms of
The Guardian view on Catalan independence: time to talk | Editorial This is a dangerous and volatile moment for both Madrid and Barcelona. Both sides should keep calm and negotiate The Spanish prime minister, Mariano Rajoy,
The Guardian view on food standards: the cost of competition | Editorial Look away now: an investigation into one food processor might put you off your next chicken meal For almost every meat eater, chicken is the great standby. Every day, more than 2 million birds are consumed: spiced up as drumsticks or curry-sauced thighs or succulently ham-wrapped breasts. But there is perhaps no other area of food production where what we eat has become so distant from what happens to it on the way to the plate. It is not a process for the faint-hearted: and as an investigation by the Guardian and ITV has found , it can also br
The Guardian view on Trump and Jerusalem: undiplomatic diplomacy | Editorial Donald Trump used to brag that he would bring his dealmaking skills to the world’s most intractable problems. Instead he has folded without a card being dealt Thirty years ago this weekend the Continue reading...
The Guardian view on universal credit: brake, don’t accelerate | Editorial The government plans to speed up the rollout of its welfare reform. But what matters is the delay in paying people who desperately need it Universal Credit, once trailed as the Conservatives’ flagship benefit reform, has staggered from crisis to crisis since its inception seven years ago. On Thursday a letter from a dozen Tory backbenchers to the work and pensions secretary, David Gauke, calling for a pause was leaked to the Daily Telegraph. Later, the former government adviser Dame Louise Casey added her voice, warning that to go ahead with
The Guardian view on Yemen: a catastrophe that shames Britain | Editorial The world’s worst humanitarian crisis is deteriorating as a Saudi blockade prevents desperately needed food, fuel and medicine from entering the country. London’s unstinting support for Riyadh makes the UK complicit Twenty years ago, Tony Blair acknowledged the British government’s responsibility for the Irish famine that killed one million people: a healing gesture needed because, even after a century and a half, pain and anger endured and the responsibility of another famine – perhaps the worst for decades, millions are on the brink
The Guardian view on Catalonia’s election: a mandate for compromise | Editorial Both sides in the dispute about Catalan independence have behaved provocatively. The balanced outcome of this week’s vote presents an opportunity to do things differently the new Catalan parliament in spite of, and perhaps because of, the jailing and exile of key leaders. Yet the result is hardly a triumph for these parties, which although winning 70 of the 135 seats, had the backing of only 47.5% of the votes in a very high turnout. There is no mandate for Catalan independence there. But there is no mandate for the status quo either. Both si
The Guardian view on BBC pay: Carrie Gracie tells the story | Editorial The former China editor has struck a blow for women everywhere by her brave stand for pay transparency and equality. She is a hero for our times Carrie Gracie’s 200 years . Her principled stand cannot be dismissed just because Continue reading...
The Guardian view on the Catalonia election: the challenge of compromise | Editorial Campaigning begins this week in an election that will shape Spain and affect the whole of Europe. First, the region’s imprisoned political leaders should be freed to campaign Campaigning in Catalonia’s 21 December regional election begins officially on Tuesday. Opinion polls show pro- and anti-independence political parties running enhanced version of Catalan autonomy for the future. Now things are set to accelerate again. More, not less, political turmoil could lie ahead.
The Guardian view on Tate Modern’s swings: more to art than Instagram | Editorial
The Guardian view on Britain’s productive forces: they are not working | Editorial The big economic question now is whether capitalism in the UK is capable of generating enough gains from growth
The Guardian view on Syria: Putin tests the west | Editorial As a new round of talks gets under way in Geneva, Russia seeks to cement its military gains in favour of the Assad dictatorship by securing UN validation One lesson of history is that peace plans are forged by the victors. Almost exactly a year after Talks, sponsored by the United Nations, are expected in Geneva this week. That is to be welcomed, even though hopes of a breakthrough are slim. Since 2012, numerous rounds of negotiations have come and gone, all essentially fruitless. All too often it was Russian vetoes that hampered effective
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Grad School Funding for non-research students!
Civilization 5: Does Arts funding and Science funding cancel each other out? If both Arts funding and Science funding are active at the same time, is the result the same as if neither of them were active?
Does the combination of Guardian combinations affect which Guardian you get? You can choose to combine 2 of any Guardian as long as they are the same rarity. Does the choice of type of Guardians you pick to combine affect the outcome of which Guardian you receive?
If Russia is funding right-wing politicians within the EU, why doesn't the EU return the favor and start funding Putin's opponents in Russia? There are numerous reports about how Russia is financing right-wing politicians within the EU in order to unbalance the Union. But why doesn't the EU return the favor and start funding people like Alexei Navalny or Mikhail Khodorkovsky? Russia already claims that "the West" is funding it's opposition, so it wouldn't give any more ammunition to Russian propaganda.
Does the Guardian's Range stat affect the guardian pet's range, or the towers' range boost amount? Just beat it with my monk, and the language isn't clear — is investing in the guardian pet stat guardian's range going to enhance the range at which the little pet reaches out to boost towers, or ...
Op-Ed or Editorial? I have a piece that is an opinion written by a columnist. If I only had the designation of an op-ed or of an editorial. What word better describes the piece? An editorial is supposed to be written by ...
AC
Draw an ER-Diagram for the following entities card type with attributes card-type-idname and editorial-category with the attridutes editorial-category-id editorial-category-name and editorial with at? Definations Of Editorials An editorial (often leader or leading article in the United Kingdom) is a phrase or article by a news organization newspaper or magazine that expresses the opinion of the editor, editorial board, or publisher. ... the department within a publishing house responsible for the content of its titles, both by commissioning and acquiring but also subsequently ensuring accuracy and completeness of the finished publication Types Of Editorial == editorial of arguementation = Answered By, M.Faisal Shahid
Can a 15 year old be questioned by police at school without a parent or guardian resonable effort to contact parents or guardian before questioning in Minnesota?
Do Tribal Governments who receive federal funding have to adhere to fair labor standards?
Is there any funding hope for a single 38yo bipolar women already with a BS wanting to go to school for an AAS but has massive student loan and credit card debt and has no money to return to school? To whom ever posted this question, have you found an answer?
In the types of editorial what do editorial information means? Editorial- a type of newspaper article that states an opinion about a current topic of interest
In the types of editorial what do editorial information means?
In the types of editorial what do editorial information means?
Does accepting section 8 vouchers constitute being a recipient of Federal Funding under Section 504 of the Fair Housing Act? Yes it does. Section 504 pertains to disability and civil rights compliance. All federal housing programs must comply with 504.
Where does public school funding come from?
Home foreclosures affect on school funding?
Where does United States public school funding come from?
Late week JDaves was at a fair an old time fair and dress up in one of their outfits can anyone tell you where and when the fair is to be you would love to go The fair is like when there was maidens?
Which method of organization is a appropriate for an essay discussing two different school funding proposals? Compare and Contrast
[05-12] If having to give a speech why school needs funding is that a process oriented nature of communication?
How do you reach true and fair view?
Can a student with good credit who has been in US for 20 months with funding from school apply for a loan or does he need a US citizen as a guarantor?
Can you take your child out of school if you are not the legal guardian but you have joint custody?
Can you enroll in high school when you are 18 and not living with a parent or guardian?
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Yout
The guardian view on the grenfell inquiry: hear the victims’ voices | editorial - The guardian view on the grenfell inquiry: hear the victims' voices | editorial Exactly six months after the Grenfell Tower fire in which 71 people died, the first formal sessions ...
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Roebuck Fighting for Fair Education Funding - Democratic Chairman of the Pa. House Education Committee Rep. Jim Roebuck is fighting for equitable funding for all of Pennsylvania public schools. Roebuck ...
SCHOOL FUNDING PUBLIC HEARING - This video is about the November 2/2017 SCHOOL FUNDING PUBLIC HEARING held at the Bethel Inns Conference Center at 6:30 pm.
The Observer view on Donald Trump’s state visit to Britain Observer editorial - Read More/Source/Credit(FAIR USE): ...
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