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Crucial test for Benedictine monks’ new leader as order faces sex abuse inquiry

Radio show regular Christopher Jamison takes over as abbot president at a time when the Catholic order is under intense scrutinyHe has been an abbot, an author, a TV star and a radio breakfast show regular and has been described as the country’s most influential Benedictine monk since Cardinal Basil Hume. Now Christopher Jamison is to attempt his most important role: saviour of the reputation of his monastic order.At the start of August the monks of the English Benedictine Congregation – an association of 13 Roman Catholic communities of monks and nuns – elected Jamison as their leader. His installation as abbot president came just days after Professor Alexis Jay confirmed that the public inquiry she is chairing into child sexual abuse in England and Wales would focus its hearings during October and November on scandals at Benedictine schools and monasteries. The choice of Jamison was almost certainly no coincidence.
Crucial test for Benedictine monks’ new leader as order faces sex abuse inquiry
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Driving test examiners could be given body cameras because they are being increasingly attacked by failed candidates. The DVSA says there were 240 incidents of physical or verbal abuse reported in 2016, compared with approximately 180 the year before. One incident in March involved a candidate who was asked to stop the car after committing a number of serious errors. He swore at the examiner and then drove wildly across a dual carriageway – forcing the tester to use dual controls to bring the vehicle to a stop. The culprit was subsequently banned from taking future practical exams at a test centre in West Yorkshire, and he will be supervised during any future tests elsewhere. DVSA chief executive Gareth Llewellyn said: “We do not tolerate anyone abusing, threatening or assaulting staff. “Our message is clear – whatever has happened, don’t take it out on our staff. If you do, we’ll press for the strongest possible penalties.” Other DVSA workers, including vehicle testers and roadside enforcement staff, have also suffered abuse in their roles. A trial will see the agency’s roadside workers wear body cameras, and the devices will be rolled out to include driving test examiners if they prove effective. Pete Williams, road safety spokesman for the RAC, said: “Examiners at the DVSA play a vital role in ensuring the safety of drivers and vehicles on our roads on a daily basis. “It’s therefore disappointing to see such a marked increase in the level of verbal and physical abuse they are encountering from the very people they are trying to help. “The majority of UK drivers and road users will wholeheartedly support a zero-tolerance approach to such behaviour.” Source link Driving test examiners may be given body cameras after spate of attacks was originally published on News London
Give a sequence such that root test works while ratio test fails
Question: Give a sequence $(a_n)_{n=1}^\infty$ with $a_n>0$ such that root test works while ratio test does not work, that is, $$\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}(a_n)^{\frac{1}{n}} \text{ exists}$$ while $$\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}\frac{a_{n+1}}{a_n} \text{ does not exist}.$$ My attempt: Define a sequence $(a_n)_{n=1}^\infty$ such that $$ a_n = \begin{cases} 2^{n-1} & \text{if }n \text{ is odd,} \\ 2^{n+1} & \text{if }n \text{ is even}. \end{cases} $$ Odd subsequence $(a_{n_j})_{j=1}^\infty$ implies that $\lim_{j\rightarrow\infty}(a_{n_j})^{\frac{1}{n_j}} = \lim_{j\rightarrow\infty} 2^{1-\frac{1}{n_j}} = 2 $ while even subsequence $(a_{n_k})_{k=1}^\infty$ implies that $\lim_{k\rightarrow\infty}(a_{n_k})^{\frac{1}{n_k}} = \lim_{k\rightarrow\infty} 2^{1+\frac{1}{n_k}} = 2.$ It follows that $\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}(a_n)^{\frac{1}{n}} = 2,$ that is, root test works. However, for odd subsequence $(a_{n_j})_{j=1}^\infty,$ $$\lim_{j\rightarrow\infty}\frac{a_{n_j+1}}{a_{n_j}} = \lim_{n\rightarrow\infty} \frac{2^{n_j+1}}{2^{n_j-1}} = \lim_{n\rightarrow\infty} 4 = 4.$$ For even subsequence $(a_{n_k})_{k=1}^\infty,$ $$\lim_{k\rightarrow\infty}\frac{a_{n_k+1}}{a_{n_k}} = \lim_{k\rightarrow\infty} \frac{2^{n_k-1}}{2^{n_k+1}} = \lim_{k\rightarrow\infty} \frac{1}{4} = \frac{1}{4}.$$ Therefore, $\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}\frac{a_{n+1}}{a_n}$ does not exist, that is, ratio test does not work. Does my example work?
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At the beginning of the period Scottish monasticism was dominated by monks called Céli Dé (lit. "vassals of God"), anglicised as culdees. At St Andrews and elsewhere, Céli Dé abbeys are recorded and the round towers at Brechin and Abernethy are evidence of Irish influence. Gaelic monasticism was vibrant and expansionary for much of the period and dozens of monasteries, often called Schottenklöster, were founded by Gaelic monks on the continent. The introduction of the continental type of monasticism to Scotland is associated with Queen Margaret, the wife of Máel Coluim III, although her exact role is unclear. She was in communication with Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury, and he provided a few monks for a new Benedictine abbey at Dunfermline (c. 1070). Subsequent foundations under Margaret's sons, the kings Edgar, Alexander I and particularly David I, tended to be of the reformed type that followed the lead set by Cluny. These stressed the original Benedictine virtues of poverty, chastity and obedience, but also contemplation and service of the Mass and were followed in various forms by large numbers of reformed Benedictine, Augustinian and Cistercian houses.
Crucial test for Benedictine monks’ new leader as order faces sex abuse inquiry
Radio show regular Christopher Jamison takes over as abbot president at a time when the Catholic order is under intense scrutinyHe has been an abbot, an author, a TV star and a radio breakfast show regular and has been described as the country’s most influential Benedictine monk since Cardinal Basil Hume. Now Christopher Jamison is to attempt his most important role: saviour of the reputation of his monastic order.At the start of August the monks of the English Benedictine Congregation – an association of 13 Roman Catholic communities of monks and nuns – elected Jamison as their leader. His installation as abbot president came just days after Professor Alexis Jay confirmed that the public inquiry she is chairing into child sexual abuse in England and Wales would focus its hearings during October and November on scandals at Benedictine schools and monasteries. The choice of Jamison was almost certainly no coincidence.
When we had come almost to them I called aloud to their leader, when the whole party halted and turned toward us. The crucial test had come. Could we but deceive these men the rest would be comparatively easy.
We must pass over entirely the history of publishing and book-selling in ancient times, a subject too vast for adequate summary in a preliminary survey of this sort. With the fall of Rome and the wholesale destruction that accompanied the barbarian invasions a new chapter begins in the history of the dissemination of literature. This chapter opens with the founding of the scriptorium, or monastic copying system, by Cassiodorus and Saint Benedict early in the sixth century. To these two men, Cassiodorus, the ex-chancellor of the Gothic king Theodoric, and Benedict, the founder of the Benedictine order, is due the gratitude of the modern world. It was through their foresight in setting the monks at work copying the scriptures and the secular literature of antiquity that we owe the preservation of most of the books that have survived the ruins of the ancient world. At the monastery of Monte Cassino, founded by Saint Benedict in the year 529, and at that of Viviers, founded by Cassiodorus in 531, the Benedictine rule required of every monk that a fixed portion of each day be spent in the scriptorium. There the more skilled scribes were entrusted with the copying of precious documents rescued from the chaos of the preceding century, while monks not yet sufficiently expert for this high duty were instructed by their superiors.
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